I have to + (verb)

The words ‘have to’ describe something that needs to take place soon. It expresses certainty, necessity, or obligation.

Here are some examples:

“I have to switch schools.”
“I have to use the telephone.”
“I have to go to the bathroom.”
“I have to leave.”
“I have to unpack my bags.”

You can also add the word ‘don’t’ to suggest that someone is not required to do something.

“I don’t have to switch schools.”
“I don’t have to use the telephone.”
“I don’t have to go to the bathroom.”
“I don’t have to leave.”
“I don’t have to unpack my bags.”

I wanna + (verb)

The word ‘wanna’ is incorrect grammatically. It is equivalent to ‘want to.’ When combined with the word ‘I’ it helps communicate something you want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I wanna talk.”
“I wanna search for a job.”
“I wanna order some food.”
“I wanna marry her.”
“I wanna listen to that song.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you can change the meaning of what you are saying to something you ‘want’ to do to something you ‘do not’ want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t wanna talk.”
“I don’t wanna search for a job.”
“I don’t wanna marry her.”
“I don’t wanna listen to that song.”
“I don’t wanna order some food.”

I gotta + (verb)

‘I gotta’ is grammatically incorrect. It is more of a spoken form. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, ‘I have got to’ or ‘I’ve got to’. In the spoken form, ‘got to’ is shortened to ‘gotta’ and the word ‘have’ is dropped.

Here are some examples:

“I gotta manage my money.”
“I gotta obey the laws.”
“I gotta move to a bigger house.”
“I gotta impress my boss.”
“I gotta brush my teeth.”

By adding the word ‘have’ you can change what you are saying to express something that needs to be done in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I have got to be on time to work.”
“I’ve gotta try harder at school.”
“I’ve gotta tell my wife I’ll be late.”
“I’ve gotta learn more about the laws.”
“I’ve gotta clean my house today.”

I would like to + (verb)

This sentence lets someone know what you would be interested in doing. This can be a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I would like to answer that question.”
“I would like to compete in a cooking contest.”
“I would like to explain myself.”
“I would like to invite you over.”
“I would like to practice.”
“I would like to become a doctor.”
“I would like to see you more often.”
“I would like to thank you.”
“I would like to learn about animals.”
“I would like to meet the President.”

I plan to + (verb)

‘Plan to’ describes something that you would like to do in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I plan to find a new apartment.”
“I plan to relax on vacation.”
“I plan to surprise my parents.”
“I plan to wash my car.”
“I plan to adopt a child.”
“I plan to impress my boss.”
“I plan to watch a movie.”
“I plan to save more money.”
“I plan to read a book.”
“I plan to learn new things.”

I’ve decided to + (verb)

‘I’ve’ is short for ‘I have’ and including the word ‘decided’ you are stating that you have made a decision or come to a conclusion.

Here are some examples:

“I’ve decided to accept the job.”
“I’ve decided to complete my degree.”
“I’ve decided to change my bad habits.”
“I’ve decided to extend my membership at the gym.”
“I’ve decided to form a chess club.”
“I’ve decided to hand over my responsibilities.”
“I’ve decided to help you move.”
“I’ve decided to interview for the job.”
“I’ve decided to increase my work load.”
“I’ve decided to manage a store.”

I was about to + (verb)

When stating ‘I was about to’ you are informing someone that you are going to be doing something at that moment or in the very near future.

Here are some examples:

“I was about to go out.”
“I was about to go to dinner.”
“I was about to go to bed.”
“I was about to go to work.”
“I was about to say the same thing.”
“I was about to call you.”
“I was about to send you an email.”
“I was about to mow my grass.”
“I was about to order us some drinks.”
“I was about to watch television.”